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Fiber Content for Fabrics - Labeling Made Easy

Fiber Content for Fabrics - Labeling Made Easy

  • Overview
  • USA Requirements
  • Canada Regulations
  • Labeling is important for many reasons. Most importantly, for your finished articles it's also a requirement. We realize that not everyone is a fiber expert. We continue to get questions about the fiber content of our fabrics for labeling the finished articles. In this blog post, we hope to answer some of the most common questions about fiber content, regulations & labeling.

    Fiber content is essentially what the fabric is made of. The fiber content determines the label required for your finished article. However in some cases you are not required to disclose what's in it, or at least some parts of it.

    If a fabric is being used as an interlining, then there's a good possibility it does not need to be disclosed. It's ONLY if the interlining is added to an article to provide warmth then it has to be disclosed, otherwise it is not required. This is in compliance with both US and Canada regulations. Regulations of other countries also possibly have the same requirements given the global trading of textile products. To explain it clearly we have compiled information from the US and Canada regulations.

  • USA : Threading Your Way Through the Labeling Requirements Under the Textile and Wool Acts

    The entire labeling requirements can be found at this link

    The Exceptions section clearly states that fiber disclosure is not required for interlining unless it is incorporated for warmth or contains wool. See excerpt from this link below:

    Exceptions to the fiber disclosure requirement

    Some parts of a textile or wool product do not have to be counted for labeling purposes — even if they are made of a fibrous material. These include trim, linings (unless used for warmth), small amounts of ornamentation, and the threads that hold the garment together.

    ……

    Linings and interlinings

    If linings, interlinings, fillings, or paddings are used only for structural purposes, you don’t have to disclose their fiber. However, if you voluntarily say — or imply — anything about their fiber content, the requirements of the statutes and rules apply.

    If linings, interlinings, fillings, or paddings are incorporated for warmth (including metallic-coated textile linings and linings or fillings that contain any amount of wool), their fiber must be disclosed as a sectional disclosure.

  • CANADA: Guide to the Textile Labelling and Advertising Regulations

    The entire labeling requirements can be found at this link

    The Exceptions in this case can be found in the section on Findings, this section clearly states that fiber disclosure is not required for interlining and lining unless it is for warmth

    (vi) Findings Sections 25 and 39 Regulations

    The term findings means any textile fibre product that is added to the consumer textile article for a functional purpose, differs in textile fibre content from the article to which it has been added and does not constitute a part of the outer surface of that article unless it is incorporated at or along an edge. Some examples of findings are elastic yarns that are added in a limited area in socks (not all hosiery), interfacing, facings, buttons, zippers, fasteners, thread, gussets, leg, neck and wrist bands, concealed pockets, plackets, shoulder pads, elastic used in a casing at the waist, legs and/or wrists or used in smocking, etc. Any lining (other than a laminated or bonded lining), interlining or padding incorporated for structural purposes, and not for warmth, are also considered findings.

    Findings do not have to be declared but, if disclosed, the textile fibre content must be shown separately from and following all other disclosures, with a clear indication that it is the textile fibre content of the findings that is being shown.

Disclaimer: The above guidance is from our interpretation of the quoted regulations. Please conduct your own research to make sure you are following all your country’s regulations.

  • Fiber Content for All Fabrics
  • Zorb Interlinings & Hidden Layers
  • Zorb® fabrics are made using a proprietary blend of wicking and absorbing fibers that give it its unique properties. Fiber content for Zorb does not need to be disclosed when it is used in diapers or soakers.

    Zorb Original is an interlining that is NOT used for providing warmth in articles, so it doesn't need to be disclosed.

    Zorb 3D contains inner absorbent fillings; since it's not used for providing warmth in articles, so it doesn't need to be disclosed.

    Zorb 4D CORE Eco-PUL contains a hidden waterproof layer; since the layer is sandwiched between 2 outside layers and is NOT used for providing warmth in articles, so the hidden layer content doesn't need to be disclosed. The outside layers content can be disclosed.

You can find the exact fiber content that you will need for labeling purposes for each of the fabrics in the above list - see tab for 'Fiber Content for All Fabrics'. If you have any questions, feel free to Contact us.

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